REVIEW: 1000Mods – Repeated Exposure To…..

Greek stoner lords make it big on album number three 

This record has been out for a couple of months in their native Greece and the rest of mainland Europe, and is more proof of the thriving scene in their homeland.

Billing themselves as “psychedelic stoner rock” 1000Mods have nothing to do with the mod scene at all – indeed you suspect that the only time these boys would consider going underground would be if there were dirty, fat, thick riffs to be found.

And that, essentially is what these eight songs provide. Lots of them too, as well as a very neat line in sloganeering lyrics. In fact, it is arguable that any and all of the choruses could find themselves on the back of t-shirts.

Take the brilliant opener, “Above179” a cut you can imagine being immense fun to hear live, and by the time singer Dani has bawled “we are the dogs, the kings of nowhere” at you, you are essentially in their web.

Where some bands would establish this sound and not alter,  1000Mods have hit on a winning formula here. Sure, it’s unmistakably a loud rock album, but there are subtle differences – “Loose” for example, buzzes and hums with fuzzy psychedelics, but crucially you can still headbang to the damn thing.

The short and sweet “Electric Carve” gets bonus points for sounding like Clutch playing southern  rock, while “The Son” stretches itself over nearly nine minutes of twists, turns, thrills and spills, and is quite a trip (in all senses of the word).

“Repeated Exposure To….” Is a record that has got the balance right. Yes it can go off these lengthy journeys, but also it is perfectly happy to chuck in a heads-down banger like “A.W” and the mighty intro of “On A Stone” has more than a hint of Orange Goblin at their most spaced out about it.

Another thing to say about the album is that it sounds sonically marvellous. That could be because its final touches were put together Brad Boatright, the audio mastering engineer of Sleep’s “Dopesmoker”, whatever, all that were involved in this have excelled themselves here.

“Groundhog Day” is the collection at its most tripped out, with its beguiling melody mixed together with what at this stage be called trademark guitar sound, while the closing “Into The Spell” is another that takes as long as it needs to in order to make its point, doing so with a kind of hypnotic quality mixed up in its odd rhythms and lyrical pattern.

“Repeated Exposure To….” Is a record that is well named. Indeed, it is only with repeated listening that you become aware of its true skill. It is more than worth your time.

Rating 8/10